The Ghost Net Art Project

Shekeena Pahimbung easily fits into this basket as it was being made during the first ghost net workshop in Aurukun in 2009. Photo by Sue Ryan.

The Ghost Net Art Project

Ghost net art has proven to be a great vehicle for alerting the general public to the damage that ghost nets inflict on the marine environment.

Even before GhostNets Australia started working with indigenous rangers to clear Australia's northern coastline of ghost nets, people were using them for diverse purposes. In various northern Australian indigenous communities you might see ghost nets being used as screens on verandahs, adorned with shells and glass or plastic floats, or as fencing for chook pens. Fishing and yam bags were made from pieces of net found washed up on beaches.

One thing that you wouldn't see however was articles made of ghost net on display in museums and art galleries - an occurrence not so unusual these days.

Explore the thumbnails below to learn more about how this new exciting art genre evolved; the different styles and approaches with workshopping in various indigenous communities and how the art has been used to spread the word to the general public.

Public Events

We have participated in many public events, from remote communities to capital cities.

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The Workshops

Workshops encouraged locals to take up ghost net art in hot-spot locations.

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Sue Ryan

Sue Ryan - image maker, storyteller and architect of the Ghost Net Art Project.

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